Wildlife Emergency?

Elementary

This program challenges students with critical thinking questions which expands their knowledge, inquiry communication, and application skills.

Each program includes five interactive workstations with live animal demonstrations from our Animal Ambassadors team.

Program is ideal for:
  • An introduction to a new unit;
  • A review for a unit;
  • A review for a unit test;
  • A culminating activity such as a Performance Task or Independent Study Unit.
Live Animal visitors may include:
  • Porcupine
  • Opossum
  • Striped Skunk
  • Groundhog
  • Bunny
  • …and more!

Young children have an inherent curiosity about things in nature. This topic takes advantage of that curiosity by beginning a study of a variety of living things. The focus is on investigating the basic needs and characteristics of living things, observing their similarities and differences, and developing an understanding of their general characteristics.

Grade 1 students will discover that all living things have some similar needs, and many also have unique needs. Students will recognize that humans have a special responsibility for maintaining a healthy environment, so that they and other living things can continue to have their needs met by that environment. Students will learn why all living things are important and why they should be treated with care and respect.

There are two things that go hand-in-hand: children and animals. Involving Grade 1 students with opportunities to gain knowledge and fascination is one way Canadians can help ensure the future of our natural history. For young children, putting things into perspective is always easier when they experience the “real things”. They begin to care, appreciate, love, and respect. They begin to dream about becoming a veterinarian, paleontologist, or a zoologist.

During a formal discussion and interactive opportunities with the animals, the students will nourish their curiosity and it will help them develop a caring and respectful attitude towards all living things.

Growth and Changes in Animals focuses on investigating the distinct characteristics of animals related to appearance, behaviour, growth, and change.

Grade 2 students will study a variety of native species and identify important similarities and differences among them. As well as making the obvious physical comparisons, students will look at ways in which human activities have an impact on specific animals and their survival, and ways in which the animals’ environment has an impact on their development. They will also examine the importance of animals and the need for humans to protect animals and the places where they live.

There are two things that go hand-in-hand: children and animals. Involving Grade 2 students with opportunities to gain knowledge and fascination is one way Canadians can help ensure the future of our natural history. For young children, putting things into perspective is always easier when they experience the “real things”. They begin to care, appreciate, love, and respect. They begin to dream about becoming a veterinarian, a paleontologist, or a zoologist.

During a formal discussion and interactive opportunities with the animals, the students will nourish their curiosity and it will help them develop a caring and respectful attitude towards all living things.

Growth and Changes in Plants focuses on the characteristics and requirements of plants and the ways in which plants grow. Students will observe and investigate a wide variety of local plants and will consider the impact of human activity on plants and their habitats. Students will also learn about the importance of plants as sources of oxygen, food, and shelter, and the need for humans to protect plants and their habitats.​

At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Parts of a Plant
  • Aging A Tree
  • Difference Between Deciduous & Coniferous Trees
  • Seed Dispersal
  • Plants as Food
  • Endangered Plants & Invasive Plant

This strand focuses on habitats, the natural communities that depend on them, and the impacts that changes to habitats can have on interrelationships among plants and animals within these communities. Students will learn that living things (including humans) rely on other living things for the energy and resources they need to live. They will also investigate factors that alter various habitats and communities, including those factors that occur naturally and those that result from human action.

At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Food Chains
  • Necessities of Life – The White-tailed Deer
  • Adaptations
  • Surviving in a Specific Habitat
  • Human Dependence on Natural Materials
  • Classifying Organisms in a Food Chain

As students continue to make choices in their lives, they need to know that choices they make about their bodies may have lifelong effects. This topic, Human Organ Systems, helps students understand that the body is made up of a number of organs and that these organs are parts of systems that can be affected by a variety of factors. A comparison of human and animal systems will help students learn the location, structure, and function of the major organs of the respiratory, circulatory, and digestive systems. Students will also develop an understanding of the importance of proper nutrition and exercise to the healthy functioning of organ systems.

At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Things We Eat
  • The Digestion of Starch
  • Taking Pulse Rates
  • Rate of Respiration in Fish
  • Teeth
  • Common Human & Animal Diseases/Disorders

Because all living things (including humans) are connected, maintaining biodiversity is critical to the health of the planet. Students will learn that biodiversity includes diversity among individuals, species, and ecosystems. Through observations of a specific habitat and the classification of organisms, students will have a first-hand opportunity to appreciate the diversity of living things while recognizing the roles and interactions of individual species within the whole.

When assessing human impacts on species and ecosystems, especially at a local level, students must be given opportunities to look at a variety of points of view. They should consider how and why the perspectives of developers, people concerned about the environment, and residents of the local community might be similar or different. Through thoughtful consideration of various viewpoints and biases, students not only can look for ways in which people might come to agreement on how to minimize the negative impact of their actions, but also will be able to make more informed decisions about their own positions and about action they can take.

​At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Distinguishing Characteristics of Vertebrate Animals
  • Scientific Names
  • Human Dependence on Natural Materials
  • Interrelationships within Species – The Lynx & Snowshoe Hare
  • Invasive Species
  • Grouping Things By Similarity

Students realize that humans have many impacts on the environment. In the study of this topic, they will analyse some of these impacts and their consequences, while reflecting upon their personal responsibility to protect the environment. During investigations, the students will observe existing ecosystems and investigate factors that may affect balances within the system. Students will learn that ecosystems consist of communities of plants and animals that are dependent on each other as well as on the non-living parts of the environment.

​At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Factors Affecting the Balance of Nature
  • Living Things and their Natural Environment
  • DDT in a Food Chain
  • Altering the Balance in an Ecosystem
  • Carrying Capacity: Investigating a Predator-Prey Relationship
  • The Role of a Consumer – The Lynx

Cells are the smallest unit of life, and each cell is a system nested within a system. In Grade 8, students will continue to develop their knowledge of organisms by focusing on the structure and function of cells in plants and animals. Our knowledge of cells has increased enormously since the middle of the twentieth century, and students will examine the implications of this knowledge for individuals, society, and the environment.

​At completion of these eight interactive programs, students will have learned about:

  • Cell Size & Surface Area to Volume Ratio
  • Plant & Animal Cells
  • Measuring Osmosis
  • Specialized Cells in a Plant
  • Observing Protists
  • Diffusion

Understanding Life Systems

“I thought that the program was fantastic! Our Wildlife Educator was extremely knowledgeable and engaging.  I definitely want to make this an annual event at our school!”
 – Grade 7/8 Teacher